Knee Pain

Pain in the Knee and What to do About it

Kerrie-Ann Bernard Knee pain

 

Whether it’s front knee pain, back knee pain, or side knee pain, it can be debilitating. Today, we’re figuring out where your pain is coming from and what to do about. While the causes and treatments for knee pain are many, here are 4 main causes

Patello-Femoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)

If you’ve got pain in and around the kneecap (or patella) with no noticeable injury or swelling you could have PFPS. This is when the cartilage under the kneecap gets worn down through overuse. PFPS is common in active people. So how do you know if you have PFPS?

What you will feel

  • On the inside of the kneecap
  • Around edge or under kneecap
  • Pain becomes worse with activity

What can you do at home?

  • Ice your knee(s) to manage pain
  • Strengthen your hip and core to improve your overall knee mechanics
  • Stretch your quads and hip flexors to improve range of motion

IT Band Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)

Runner’s knee might be something you’ve heard of before. Pain from this condition is usually on the outside of the knee and increases with repetitive motion such as running and cycling. Much like PFPS there isn’t usually swelling or noticeable injury with runner’s knee.

What you will feel

  • Pain behind or around the kneecap
  • Pain when you bend the knee
  • Pain worsens when walking downstairs
  • Popping or grinding sensations in the knee

What can you do at home?

  • Ice your knee(s) to manage pain
  • Strengthen your hips, core and feet
  • Stretch your hamstrings and quads to improve range of motion
  • Foam roller to loosen tight muscles

Patellar Tendonopathy (Jumper’s Knee)

Jumper’s knee is common in athletes. It is caused when there is injury or swelling to the point where the tendon can attach to the bone.

What you will feel

  • Pain below the knee cap (along the patellar tendon)
  • Pain often increases with activity – can become a sharp pain
  • Especially with jumping, deep squatting, and high force activities

What can you do at home?

  • Ice your knee(s) to manage pain
  • Strengthen your quads, hips and core
  • Stretch your quads and hip flexors to improve range of motion
  • Wear a supportive knee brace
  • Change up your activities to put less strain on the knee(s)

Tibio-femoral Osteoarthritis (OA)

Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease in adults worldwide and is most common in people over the age of 50. OA is the inflammation of the bone and joint caused by the deterioration of joints, cartilage, bone, and ligaments.

What you will feel

  • Pain that wraps around the knee joint that worsens after activity
  • Stiffness in the morning that improves throughout the day
  • Reduced range of motion of the knee
  • Swelling

What can you do at home?

  • Ice your knee(s) to manage pain
  • Stay active!

What can physiotherapy do?

If you’re experiencing any of the above symptoms it is recommended that you seek out an assessment from a qualified physiotherapist. A full and proper assessment can diagnose the cause of your knee pain and is the first step in creating a unique treatment plan for your condition.

Physiotherapy can do

  • Control pain
  • Correct leg mechanics and reduce stress on the knee
  • Provide exercises to promote symmetry and avoid future injury
  • Strengthen and stretch muscles to regain range of motion
  • Guide you on how to keep participating in the activities you enjoy

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